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Cartoon theories that may ruin your childhood

By Sj.Cliff
Cartoon theories that may ruin your childhood

People seem to have a habit of over-thinking trivial things.

Alternate theories to popular cartoons have been growing in popularity in the media recently: The Simpsons are really in Australia or that Homer is in a coma. Crazy shit here. Surely these people had better things to do.

That led me to think about what other theories are floating about online and what other cartoons from my earlier life could be totally ruined. The 90’s were full of amazing cartoons, so I thought I’d start looking there.

It was a hard and, frankly, pretty disturbing afternoon. Any innocent joy of my childhood viewing history has been totally killed by my search. Here are the best/strangest ones I could find:

Fosters home for imaginary friends

As you can see, all of the adventures in the series came from the head of Frankie, the uptight granddaughter of the Home for Imaginary Friends owner. In this theory, it turns out that Frankie is autistic and a little deranged.

All of the episodes are really her imagination creating friends for her to go on adventures with instead of interacting with the outside world…

Dark.

Pinky and the Brain

Be prepared to have your mind blow.

The opening theme song to this popular cartoon alludes to one of the pair being a genius and the other being mental. Most people would assume that the character of Brain (with a massive head for holding what I presumed was brains) is the smart one, right?

Wrong, according to this theory. We should be looking at the adorably goofy Pinky.

Unlike most fan theories, there is actually evidence within an episode that proves this one.

In the episode “That Smarts”, Brain starts looking into why his plans to escape keep failing. According to his research (and a conveniently shaped graph) all blame lies with Pinky, leading Brain to make a “smart machine” to make Pinky clever.

But does that machine really work? While smart, Pinky points out a flaw in Brains original calculations that points to the machines creator being the cause of all the problems. Pretty smart, if you ask me.

and the answer is BRAIN!

If we take the theme song as gospel and the two characters do fall under the brackets of insane and genius, then that can only lead to one conclusion. With his constant attempts to escape, bunch of hair-brained schemes and constant mood swings: Brain is as mad as a box of frogs. The miscalculation earlier on in the episode leads us to question whether any of Brains previous endeavours have been successful… and if Pinky has been smart all along.

TL:DR Pinky is a genius and Brain is insane.

Batman

Batman had a troubled childhood, so it wouldn’t be too much of a jump to say that he could have suffered a few mental problems.

Oh Batman, you so crazy

So riddle me this, guys, what if Batman’s villains aren’t real but hallucinations of Bruce Wayne’s inner demons?

Let’s break it down by character:

Two-Face (Harvey Dent) represents both sides of Bruce’s personality, the millionaire playboy and the caped crusader.

Mr Freeze is Batman’s cold attitude towards others and relationships… who ironically came into creation due to the loss of a loved one. Noticed the similarities?

The Penguin is a posh, rich guy. If it wasn’t for the mob connections, he and Bruce Wayne would probably be in the same social circle due to his high class and excessive wealth.

The best one has be The Joker; senseless, violent, crazy and disruptive – just like the death of Batman’s parents. The irrational thoughts that came to him when his mother and father were shot are personified in Batman’s most notable villain since his put on the mask.

Family Guy

This cartoon is super-late 90’s, so it’s only just acceptable on this list.

According to Redditor bblank0308, the entire plot of Family Guy lives within Peters mind. So, let’s start from the top!

Unlike the series, in this assumed reality, Meg is beautiful and popular. She really cared for little brother Chris, who was born mentally disabled due to complications at birth. Upset that Chris could never be as popular as her on his own, Meg takes him to a party. Unfortunately on the way home Meg and Chris are involved in a drunken car crash… fatally.

During this time Lois was pregnant with Stewie but unable to cope with the loss of her other children, she takes her own life.

Not being able to cope with the loss of all of his family, Peter fell into an insane delusion and creating a world where his family are fine and explaining his (and the rest of the family’s) disdain of Meg.

Shut up Meg

It also explains a lot of quirks in the show as bblank0308 explains further in the article.

Spongebob

Our porous, yellow friend’s glowing outlook on life is hilarious, slightly irritating and probably misplaced when you read about his supposed origins.

Another theory found on Reddit claims that nuclear testing is behind the life of your favourite pineapple-inhabiting sponge.

Bikini Bottom is said to be set under the atomic testing site of Bikini Atoll (which is officially confirmed in the Nickelodeon synopsis). During the 1940’s, the island served as Americas nuclear testing facility with several bombs being set off there including one underwater! There are hints to the explosions featured throughout the cartoon too!

When you think about it, deformed sea creatures make sense with all that radiation around. I mean, did you see what happened to The Incredible Hulk?

Do you have any cartoon theories that we've missed? Let me know on the socials!

 

Tagged: strange, cartoons

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